Chapter Summaries: CORR 2015

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Chapter 1: Introduction

This chapter provides information about data sources, data completeness, data quality, report organization and more.

Topics

  • Data collection from hospital dialysis programs, regional transplant programs, organ procurement organizations (OPOs) and kidney dialysis services offered at independent health facilities
  • Data sources
  • Under-reporting across Canada
  • Data quality
  • Organization of the report
  • Provincial data and small cell sizes
  • Age group reporting

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Chapter 2: Renal Replacement Therapy for End-Stage Kidney Disease

This chapter presents trends for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients who are newly diagnosed each year (incidence), patients being treated at a given point in time (prevalence), patient outcomes (survival) and kidney transplants (adult and pediatric).

Key findings

  • At the end of 2013, 41,931 Canadians were living with ESKD. Since 2004, this number has grown 35% from 30,953. Of these patients, 24,114 were on dialysis and 17,817 were living with a functioning kidney transplant.
  • Diabetes continued to be the most frequently reported primary cause of ESKD, accounting for 36% of incident patients in Canada.
  • In 2013, 5,333 patients started renal replacement therapy (RRT).
  • For the latest available data of unadjusted 5-year patient survival, 42.7% of patients on hemodialysis treatments survived at least 5 years, approximately 12% fewer patients than the 54.5% of patients on peritoneal dialysis.
  • There were 1,419 kidneys transplanted, including simultaneous kidney–pancreas (SKP) transplants, an increase of 32% over the 1,074 in 2004.
  • On December 31, there were 3,382 patients waiting for a kidney or SKP transplant. A total of 88 patients died while waiting for a kidney transplant in 2013.

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Chapter 3: Liver Transplantation

This chapter presents trends and provincial breakdowns for liver transplant recipients, patients on waiting lists and patient outcomes. In 2013, there were 5,833 patients in Canada living with a transplanted liver.

Key findings

  • In 2013, there were 5,833 Canadians living with a liver transplant.
  • In 2013, 509 liver transplants were performed, 22% more than the 417 performed in 2004.
  • On December 31, there were 498 patients waiting for a liver transplant.
  • A total of 86 patients died while waiting for a liver transplant in 2013.
  • Hepatitis C was the cause of liver failure for 21% of liver transplant patients between 2004 and 2013.
  • For the latest available data of unadjusted 5-year patient survival, 83.9% of patients who received a first liver transplant from a deceased donor survived at least 5 years.

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Chapter 4: Heart Transplantation

This chapter presents trends and provincial breakdowns for heart transplant recipients, patients on waiting lists and patient outcomes. In 2013, there were 2,611 Canadians living with a heart transplant.

Key findings

  • In 2013, there were 2,611 Canadians living with a transplanted heart.
  • A total of 192 heart-only transplants were performed.
  • On December 31, there were 167 Canadians waiting for a heart transplant.
  • A total of 20 Canadians died while on the heart transplant waiting list in 2013.

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Chapter 5: Lung Transplantation

This chapter presents trends and provincial breakdowns for lung transplant recipients, patients on waiting lists and patient outcomes. There were 1,524 Canadians living with a transplanted lung in 2013.

Key findings

  • There were 1,524 Canadians living with a lung transplant.
  • In 2013, 247 lung transplants were performed, 86% of which were double lung transplants.
  • Since 2004, the number of lung transplants has grown 86%.
  • On December 31, there were 314 Canadians waiting to receive a lung transplant.
  • A total of 52 Canadians died while waiting for a lung transplant.
  • Between 2004 and 2013, 28% of lung transplants resulted from lung tissue scarring with no known cause (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis).
  • Emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were the causes of an additional 25% of lung transplants.
  • For the latest available data of unadjusted 5-year patient survival, 65.9% of patients who received a first lung transplant from a deceased donor survived at least 5 years.

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Chapter 6: Pancreas Transplantation

This chapter presents trends for pancreas and islet cell transplant recipients, patients on waiting lists and patient outcomes. There were 177 individuals on the waiting list for a pancreas transplant in 2013.

Key findings

  • There were 59 pancreas transplants performed in 2013. Of these, 44 were simultaneous kidney–pancreas transplants.
  • A total of 177 Canadians were waiting for a pancreas transplant.
  • For the latest available data of unadjusted 5-year graft survival, 86.7% of simultaneous kidney–pancreas transplants survived at least 5 years.

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Chapter 7: Intestinal Transplantation

This chapter presents a breakdown of intestinal transplant types for the decades spanning 1994 to 2003 and 2004 to 2013. Since 1994, there have been 56 intestinal transplants reported to CORR.

Key findings

  • Small intestine transplantation is an emerging and evolving field with the potential to improve the outcomes of children and adults with intestinal failure in Canada.
  • Between 1994 and 2013, there were 56 such procedures performed in Canada, with more than half (57%) of the recipients younger than age 18.

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Chapter 8: Donors

This chapter takes a closer look at donors, both living and deceased, trends over the last decade, relationship to transplant recipients and donor rates across Canada. In 2013, living donors outnumbered deceased donors (588 versus 553).

Key findings

  • The number of Canadian organ donors increased from 887 in 2004 to 1,141 in 2013, a relative increase of 29%.
  • During that same period, the number of both deceased and living donors generally increased, and in 2013 living donors outnumbered deceased donors (588 versus 553).
  • Between 2004 and 2013, 37% of living donors in Canada were unrelated (the definition of unrelated includes spouses).

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