HPDB Pharmacists

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Pharmacists

Pharmacists assist their clients with medications in order to safely achieve desired health outcomes at home, in the community and in hospitals. They research and work collaboratively with other health care providers to deliver optimal health care solutions through effective use of health care products and services. By incorporating best care principles that are patient-centred, outcome-oriented and evidence-based, their professional practice emphasizes drug therapy management of diseases and symptoms and the promotion of wellness and disease prevention.

Please refer to Pharmacists in Canada, 2009 for more detailed information.

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Practice Setting

Pharmacists generally work as community, institutional or industrial pharmacists. Community pharmacists own and/or practise in community pharmacies, while institutional pharmacists practise in hospitals, long-term care facilities and other such health care institutions. Both work closely with other health care professionals. Industrial pharmacists participate in the research, development, manufacturing and sales of pharmaceutical products. There are also pharmacists found in a variety of other practice settings such as academics, government and regulatory organizations.


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Regulatory Environment

The table below indicates the first year in which it became mandatory for pharmacists to register with a provincial/territorial regulatory body as a condition of practice.


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Practice Criteria

To work/practise as a pharmacist, one must meet the following requirements:

  • Hold a bachelor's degree in pharmacy from an accredited program or equivalent.
  • Pass the qualifying examination administered by the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada in most provinces.
  • Register with a provincial/territorial regulatory body.

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Education Requirements

A bachelor’s degree in pharmacy is currently the entry-to-practice requirement for a pharmacist in Canada. The following table provides a comprehensive list of programs accredited by the Canadian Council for Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs.

Internationally Educated Pharmacists

To practise in Canada, an internationally educated pharmacist must meet the following requirements:

  • Contact the relevant regulatory body within the chosen province/territory for assessment and recognition of credentials, including language proficiency for registration and other licensing requirements.
  • Pass the pharmacist evaluating examination administered by the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada in most provinces.
  • Pass the qualifying examination administered by the Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada in most provinces.
  • Register with a provincial/territorial regulatory body.

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Supply Trends


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Demographic Trend


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Graduate Trends


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