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Age-standardized rate of hospitalizations entirely caused by alcohol, per 100,000 population, by province or territory, 2015–2016:

  • Canada’s average number of hospitalizations entirely caused by alcohol was 239.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador had fewer hospitalizations than average at 186.
  • Prince Edward Island had an average number of hospitalizations at 237.
  • Nova Scotia had more hospitalizations than average at 308.
  • New Brunswick had fewer hospitalizations than average at 172.
  • Quebec had fewer hospitalizations than average at 183.
  • Ontario had fewer hospitalizations than average at 195.
  • Manitoba had more hospitalizations than average at 248.
  • Saskatchewan had more hospitalizations than average at 345.
  • Alberta had more hospitalizations than average at 327.
  • British Columbia had more hospitalizations than average at 349.
  • Yukon had more hospitalizations than average at 676.
  • The Northwest Territories had more hospitalizations than average at 1,315.
  • Nunavut had more hospitalizations than average at 421.

Note

Age-standardized to the 2011 Canadian standard population.

Sources

Hospital Morbidity Database, Discharge Abstract Database, National Ambulatory Care Reporting System and Ontario Mental Health Reporting System, 2015–2016, Canadian Institute for Health Information; population estimates, 2015, Statistics Canada.